December 7, 2016: “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” Episode Review – “Invasion”

Superman Homepage reviewer T.A. Ewart (aka liheibao) reviews episodes connected to the “Supergirl” TV series, airing on The CW.

Check out his review of the second of the “Invasion” crossover episodes on “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow”, in which, after learning the Dominators’ plan for the world, the Legends must work together with The Flash (guest star Grant Gustin), Supergirl (guest star Melissa Benoist) and Green Arrow (guest star Stephen Amell) to kill them once and for all. Meanwhile, Stein (Victor Garber) figures out, with the help of others, how the team can terminate the Dominators, but is distracted by the aberration he realizes he created in 1987.

InvasionOriginally Aired: December 1, 2016
WRITTEN BY: Greg Berlanti
TELEPLAY BY: Phil Klemmer and Marc Guggenheim
DIRECTED BY: Gregory Smith

STARRING:
Stephen Amell (Oliver Queen/Green Arrow)
Franz Drameh (Jefferson Jackson/Firestorm)
Victor Garber (Martin Stein/Firestorm)
Willa Holland (Thea Queen/Speedy)
Caity Lotz (Sara Lance/White Canary)
Dominic Purcell (Mick Rory/Heat Wave)
David Ramsey (John Diggle/Spartan)
Emily Bett Rickards (Felicity Smoak)
Brandon Routh (Ray Palmer/The Atom)
Grant Gustin (The Flash)
Carlos Valdes (Cisco Ramon)
Danielle Panabaker (Caitlin Snow)
Melissa Benoist (Kara Danvers/Supergirl)
Christina Brucato (Lily Stein)
Donnelly Rhodes (Smith)
Lucia Walters (President Susan Brayden)

3Rating – 3 (out of 5): Come the Legends of Tomorrow, and the crossover comes to a close. Not a satisfactory one, but a close nonetheless. The Legends episode sidelines Supergirl, with a ridiculous mandate from Ollie, but the worst of it is the needless weight ladled onto Barry Allen’s shoulders. Yes, Barry shouldn’t have gone into the past. However, to make him pay for this mistake inch by inch is needlessly cruel. The irony of it taking place on the show where time travel is the norm, and changes are made to history all the time, should not escape the perspicacious eye of viewers either. This could have been a nice respite from the weight of what was going on Arrow or The Flash, but it seems that writers were unwilling to not use the crossover as promos for the respective series. Here is where viewers have to decide what percentage their actual make-up is more composed of: connoisseur or fanboy. You can be happy that we actually got to see these characters interact, and totally envelope yourself in the feeling that creates, or you can press for more, in which you may lose all… or receive both.

There are excellent team-up stories that are just primed for the translation from comic to television, but the idea has to be to tell a great story using the characters presented. Supergirl can’t be sidelined, and the pressing needs of each show have to be put on hold for the needs of the crossover. If the writers can accomplish this, we may just see Crisis on Infinite Earths one of these days.

Check out the “Supergirl – Episode Reviews” Contents page.

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redcape
Member

Best line……..Brandon saying to Felicity, she (Kara), looks like my cousin!!

Steve Eden
Member
I posted something on the “Arrow” review comments, but it makes more sense here, so I will re-post it here: I felt that this was pretty much a crossover of three shows, not four. “Supergirl” only had Barry and Cisco in cameo appearances. Supergirl was pretty much wasted in the other shows. The winning over of Oliver was one thing, but not including Kara in the first mission was out of character. Ollie has been around enough to know you don’t omit your strongest ally. And Kara saving him from falling to his death was rather predictable (“Hey, thanks –… Read more »
andramus
Member
@Steve Eden I read an article a couple of months ago – posted on this site I think – where the writers/producers said that the crossover was really only a 3 episode crossover with a brief prologue at the end of Supergirl’s episode. The writers/producers repeated this statement in numerous interviews and facebook/twitter posts in the lead up to this crossover so I don’t think they ever set out to mislead anyone. I think the fault lies with the CW marketing department which I don’t think the show’s creators have any control over. The CW heavily advertised this as a… Read more »
redcape
Member

Did you happen to hear while they’re all in that dream sequence Laura taking with Sara. At the wedding Laura’s mentioning to Sara something to the effect that there were a lot of guys there. Her response, Oh, I like girls!. And the last mid-season Arrow, the two gay love birds having a “I can’t do this spat”. They just can’t keep it out. Sorry…I just don’t think they need to go there in these kind of TV shows. Just my opinion and not to offend anyone.

MattComics
Member
Well redcape, I’ll just say gay folks are part of our Earth and any other Earth there might be. They’re just trying to find some purpose and happiness in this life just like the rest of us. As such their stories are as valid as anything going on with the straight characters. While I can see some argument to be made that maybe CW shows perhaps focus a bit too much on romantic and/or sexual relationships for a show meant for a broader audience it is still an aspect of life. If straight characters in the series can talk about… Read more »
liheibao
Member

Nicely said, but I do think you’re missing his point.

andramus
Member

@liheibao
I feel really obtuse because I’m not sure what point MattComics is missing.

liheibao
Member

Yes, I know. It isn’t phrased the best, but it’s there, nonetheless.

redcape
Member

Not disagreeing with you BUT….if they’re going to be main stream with this then they can take the heat, good or bad that comes with it.

MattComics
Member
This thing of not wanting them to “go there”. If you don’t have a problem with the characters being gay then where exactly is “there”? Because superhero characters talk about who they are attracted to pretty often and superhero stories deal with the effects of having a double life on straight relationships (potential or in progress) all the time. Starting with Action Comics no.1! Straight characters are not obligated to muzzle it when talking about being attracted to the opposite sex so why should that be the case for gay characters? You mentioned Curtis and his husband having their falling… Read more »
Steve Wright
Editor
Yes. It’s fake acceptance. People say they are “totally okay” with someone being gay…just don’t SHOW them being gay. To me, it’s a ridiculous argument. You are either okay with gay characters or you’re not. And Sara was out as Bi-Sexual long before the 100th episode of Arrow. Greg Berlanti is a gay man. He is also one of the most powerful television producers in Hollywood. If he wants to showcase the life of gay characters that is his right. In my opinion he has done nothing to throw it in our face, unless you just have a problem with… Read more »
liheibao
Member
And Sara was out as Bi-Sexual long before the 100th episode of Arrow. Is she still bisexual? She hasn’t shown any interest in a male character since. . .Ollie? She announces that she “likes girls!” as opposed to both. The writing seems to have taken the “Bi” aspect out of her character. People need to relax and understand that the world is changing. No offense, but comes across as incredibly dictatorial. The biggest problem I’ve seen in cases dealing with different cultures, beliefs, sexuality, is that, especially in the States, you’re not supposed to ask any questions about anything. Just… Read more »
liheibao
Member
This thing of not wanting them to “go there”. If you don’t have a problem with the characters being gay then where exactly is “there”? Good point, not that I agree, but good point nonetheless. Because superhero characters talk about who they are attracted to pretty often and superhero stories deal with the effects of having a double life on straight relationships (potential or in progress) all the time. Starting with Action Comics no.1! False equivalency. Straight characters are not obligated to muzzle it when talking about being attracted to the opposite sex so why should that be the case… Read more »
MattComics
Member
That’s been part of my point all along. What they are doing with gay characters is totally in bounds for what CW and a lot of comics usually do with straight relationships. Yet it’s the gay characters that get the “don’t go there” type of comments or eye-rolls from some reviewers. Like I said in my original post if the complaint is that the CW just generally puts too much emphasis on romance and sex I think that’s kind of understandable. But if the complaint boils down to “the characters can be gay but I don’t want to ever know… Read more »
liheibao
Member
That’s been part of my point all along. What they are doing with gay characters is totally in bounds for what CW and a lot of comics usually do with straight relationships. Yet it’s the gay characters that get the “don’t go there” type of comments or eye-rolls from some reviewers. Which isn’t true. Straight or gay, viewers don’t want any relationship forced on them. It doesn’t seem organic and no one wants their intelligence insulted. If you’re forcing characters on your audience just to show how gay people live and love, you’ll get the blowback some think is bias.… Read more »
redcape
Member

Please let us not get overly analytical. All I was saying is that these shows are not high powered adult dramas. Since they’re introducing these kinds of topics then they are going to be controversial. I just don’t want them to over shadow the fact that these are superhero shows that don’t (or shouldn’t) have time or necessity to make them an important element in the stories.

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