July 13, 2016: Meet the Chinese Super-Man and His Justice League

Meet Kenan Kong, the Chinese Super-Man written by Gene Yang, who is introduced in this week’s “New Super-Man #1” comic book.

How do you say, “Look, up in the sky!” in Mandarin? Yes, China has its own Super-Man, debuting this week in New Super-Man #1. In this DC All Access comics clip, we talk with New Super-Man writer Gene Luen Yang about this exciting new series, how this young super hero will be different from Kal-El and whether China will be getting any other familiar new heroes.

Purchase this week’s NEW SUPER-MAN #1 from TFAW.com, or download it for the Kindle or iBooks now.

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kalelasl
Member

I have seen his name Kong Kenan and Kenan Kong what is the right name?

Kal-Elvis
Member

I think it might be dependent on cultural context. For us in the U.S. and much of the “western world,” we use the individual name first and then the family name (or surname) last. In China, at least in the past, the family name/surname came first (perhaps in honor of family line? I’m not sure, hopefully someone else here knows the reason).

His individual name is Kenan, and his family name/surname is Kong.

So here, we’d call him Kenan Kong; but in China, he’d be Kong Kenan.

Kel
Member

Chinese Justice League? Okay, cool……but meanwhile, “Superman” had to renounce his American citizenship (penned by David S. Goyer, no less…(shocker?)), “the American way” part of “Truth, Justice, and the American Way” is avoided being said as much as possible, and the “of America” has to be dropped from “Justice League Of America”…something is wrong with this picture.

And all that said, the introduction of other “Super”-esque characters after Superman only serve to de-unique him (but at least Kong isn’t from the planet Krypton).

kal-bert
Member
Kel: A kryptonian, a martian, an amazon, 2 thanagarian aliens, the king of Atlantis, and yes, 2 american men Batman and Green Lantern. JLA was good in a time USA was ruled by blind patriotism and in the hardest times of the cold war, with the only 2 USA natives (quit calling USA America, that country is just a tiny part of it and it is an insult to the rest of americans being treated like they didn’t count). There is very few America in JL and their headquarters not being even in any place of America makes the full… Read more »
Kel
Member
Superman is an American, first of all (and I mean that in the sense that he is a part of the UNITED STATES, kryptonian (an advanced human, for all intents and purposes) by dna, sure, but this is just the excuse for his powers, Clark sees himself as human, and he is only Superman because he is an American), so is detective John Jones/Martian Manhunter, Batman, The Flash (Barry, Wally, Bart), Green Lanterns Hal Jordan, John Stewart, Guy Gardner, and Kyle Rayner, and Arthur Curry. Wonder Woman also makes her home in the United States Of America. They all speak… Read more »
Hypoxic
Member

American isn’t a language.

Hypoxic
Member

A down vote? Wow. It takes some hefty patriotic blinders to support the belief that American is a language.

Kel
Member

“American” is a language. There are at least 100 different words and terminologies used in the English language that are not used in the American language, American is indeed its own language.

Hypoxic
Member

Surely that’s not your understanding of the definition of language.

In any regard, as a teacher of language for 16 years, I’m well equipped to disagree with you. What you’re attempting to discribe are the varieties, or lects, of English that are commonly found in the United States, referred to as American English. No one speaks “American”. “American” isn’t a language.

Kal-Ed
Member
American is not a language, but rather an accent. The people of America speak English. I’m part British and can speak with an English accent (though I make a Good Texas slang) German is a language which I also speak fluently. Arabic is a language which I also speak. Though the Arabic world has different accents yet the same language. I know a little French too. And there is a difference between the European French and Canadian French. So I’m agreeing with Hypoxic here for stating the obvious. I do help German kids learn English every once in a while.… Read more »
Kel
Member

Agree to disagree, it’s much more than just an accent. There are at least 100 different words, meanings, and terminologies between the American language and the language of England.

Hypoxic
Member
Stating the obvious is an excellent way to put it. Unfortunately, what’s obvious isn’t always what’s preferred or what runs parallel to a hardline belief. It’s also obvious that the Earth is much older than 10,000 years old, but alas… Good on you for the multi-lingualism! Like your respect for teachers, I respect the intellectual fortitude of multi-language learners. Just to say, though, American English itself isn’t an accent. It has various accents, but is itself, as I mentioned before, a variety/lect of English. It’s interesting to note that English isn’t the official language in many states. The United States… Read more »
Kel
Member
Surely that’s not your understanding of the definition of language. Sure it is: LANGUAGE: 1.) The method of human communication, either spoken or written, consisting of the use of words in a structured and conventional way. 2.) The system of communication used by a particular community or country. Different words with different meanings + different terminologies = different language. In any regard, as a teacher of language for 16 years, I’m well equipped to disagree with you. “Old fools is the biggest fools because they’ve had the most practice at it” – Mark Twain No one speaks “American”. “American” isn’t… Read more »
Hypoxic
Member
That was a lengthy – and ineffective – introduction of unrelated quotes and definitions that don’t support your non-argument just to damn your position with a cute compromise. And what’s with the “dumb America” remark? What an unusual thing to say. You’ve lost yourself in your misunderstanding of what defines language, but you’ve lost me on whatever assumptions you’ve concocted with that final remark. Anyway, back to the compromise. There isn’t one. ‘American’ is not a language, and American English is a sociolinguistic lect of the English language. Research on the subject is pretty easy, if you’d only allow yourself… Read more »
Kal-Ed
Member

Quoting Jack Mcclane in Die Hard 5: Don’t encourage him.

That about says it all. Before this issue escalates a wee further, I’m gonna go to work and later I’ll be out with a coupla educated American Buddies, who know the difference between an accent and a language.

Over and out.

Hypoxic
Member

Heh. Nice. And right you are.

Assuming you’ll be having a few pints, drown one for the defence of statements of obviousness. ;)

Kal-Ed
Member

Forgot about the accents. In Germany and the Arab world, as well as the UK there are multiple accents. Same as in New York, Chicago, Texas, Arkansas and so forth.

Had a coupla pints. Cheers to ya.

Kel
Member

Heh. Nice. And right you are.

Assuming you’ll be having a few pints, drown one for the defence of statements of obviousness

“Defence”? I don’t know this word in the US…must be British. Is it anything like “defense”? Do educate me, teacher.

:P

Hypoxic
Member

It’s the metric spelling.

Kel
Member
That was a lengthy [response] It wasn’t, it was actually even shorter than the post it was responding to. and ineffective – introduction of unrelated quotes I thought it was pretty effective: they were all quotes that disagreed with you made by far more important and intelligent people than you (Mark Twain — pretty bright guy!). and definitions that don’t support your non-argument The definition of language supports my argument perfectly. Let’s look at the definition again, shall we? LANGUAGE: 1.) The method of human communication, either spoken or written, consisting of the use of words in a structured and… Read more »
Hypoxic
Member

Okay, dood.

Kal-Ed
Member

Justice League of Asia! Just imagine: Chinese Superman. Japanese Batman. Thai Wonder Woman. Vietnamese Flash. Korean Green Lantern. Jakartan Aquaman. And J’onn J’onnz, The Kuala Lumpurian Manhunter.

That’d be awesome.

MattComics
Member
“And all that said, the introduction of other “Super”-esque characters after Superman only serve to de-unique him (but at least Kong isn’t from the planet Krypton).” You know I’ll just be honest, I often find that I am of two minds when it comes to this. I’d generally prefer there not being an entire gaggle of Supers or Batmen or Robins or Spiders or Hulks or Captains America but kept to a small core “family” I don’t think it necessarily hurts the uniqueness of the main hero depending on how it’s handled. Also if we’re doing that I’d sort of… Read more »
Kel
Member
Rip-off characters like Supergirl I have only liked if they have origins entirely different from Superman’s; the Bruce Timm animated series did the best Supergirl for me in that she wasn’t from Krypton, but a separate, frozen planet, named Argos. And her personality and origin was different enough that it didn’t seem like a blatant beat for beat ripoff of Clark’s: she wasn’t a reporter, her personality was different, she was a teenager, etc. Batgirl I can tolerate because she’s just someone dressing up trying to imitate Batman, and Batman’s origin doesn’t depend on him being the sole survivor of… Read more »
liheibao
Member

Bryan Hutch just penned a series entitled “Justice League of America” and it featured all of the top Leaguers. The name isn’t going anywhere for any length of time, regardless of people’s opinions on it.

Superman analogues? Most characters are Superman rip-offs.

Kenan Kong? The problem is the order of the name, it’s that it’s a mash- up of Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

Better luck tomorrow.

Hypoxic
Member
There’s no mash up. The only association ‘Kenan’ has to Japanese or Korean is both of those languages can read the Pinyin from which ‘Kenan’ is entirely derived. Yang didn’t need luck, I suppose, being Chinese and all. Source ‘Kenan’ written in Pinyin – 克南 – as pronounced in Korean (so technically from Hanja) is weird, and long. It would be “Yigi-da Nam-jok”, if we go by the characters meaning ‘to overcome; to win’ and ‘south’. It could likely be condensed – maybe “Yigi Nam” – but that’s the gist of it. I’m not entiely sure about the Japanese. I’m… Read more »
liheibao
Member

For want of an “isn’t”. “The problem isn’t the order of the name, it’s the mash-up of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean”. That’s how it should have read. Have a read of the issue, if you haven’t already. It’s all there.

Hypoxic
Member

Ah, I see. I haven’t gotten to the issue yet. It’s sitting in my comiXology account – the first Superman… um… related?… title I’ve bought in quite some time.

liheibao
Member

I like the concept so much as I don’t like it. Very much on the nose, yet something I’ve interest in seeing. Biggest issue? Yang’s writing.

Hypoxic
Member

I’m curious but unfortunately the ending of the issue was spoiled for me, and now I’m less interested. Surely a solo adventure to start things off would have been a wiser direction, for nothing else but characterization. I’m not so keen on following Kong on his journey towards a better person and serious hero if he has to share space with the JLC from the start.

Hypoxic
Member

Well, I read it. I wasn’t too taken by it. I wasn’t convinced that it won’t get better, either. If Yang convinces me in issue #2 that he has crafted a good bildungsroman out this, then I’ll likely stay on for the first arc.

I didn’t pick up on the mashing of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean that you mentioned. How do you mean? Culturally?

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